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    Dillard Language Studies in the New Orleans Advocate PDF Print E-mail
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    mexican-girls

    LANGUAGE STUDIES: Dillard University is one of 157 organizations participating in the Mexican Proyecta 100,000 program, which aims to send 100,000 college students and teachers to the United States for intensive study of English as a second language.

    Dillard’s Center for Intensive Language is working with 20 Mexican participants through Dec. 13. “We hope this group is the first of many others who will come to Dillard throughout next year,” said Aurea Diab, interim director of the CIEL program.

    Over the past two years, Dillard has trained 106 learners in its CIEL program: 48 teachers and 55 students from Brazil and three students from Pakistan.

    DELGADO REGISTRATION: Registration is open for the spring 2015 semester at Delgado Community College. Spring classes begin Saturday, Jan. 17.

    The college has an open admission policy and offers instruction at a variety of levels, enabling students to progress toward their goals from any beginning point. Adults without a high school diploma can earn the equivalent at Delgado. High school students can get an early start in their careers through dual enrollment at Delgado. Educational programs at Delgado are fully accredited and industry-certified.

    Delgado offers instruction online and at nine convenient locations, including the City Park, West Bank (Algiers) and Charity School of Nursing campuses and locations in Slidell and Metairie.

    Delgado Sidney Collier opened in August on Louisa Street in the Desire-Gentilly area.

    DCC was founded in 1921 by businessman and philanthropist Isaac Delgado, who also founded the New Orleans Museum of Art. Students marked his 175th birthday recently by placing a wreath at his tomb in Metairie Cemetery, about half a mile from the college’s City Park Campus.

    Students must be admitted to Delgado in order to register for classes. For information, call (504) 671-5012 or visitwww.dcc.edu.

    GREENER CAMPUS: The state-of-the-art lighting system recently installed on five parking lots on the City Park Campus of Delgado Community College features the latest in LED lighting technology. The low-wattage, highly efficient system functions completely by solar power.

    ProLumin, of Metairie, designed and installed the system, in which 4-by-8-foot solar panels on top of poles in the campus parking lots capture energy from the sun’s rays. The energy is stored in a battery pack that stores enough energy for multiple days of power in the event of inclement or overcast weather. The bulbs are low-wattage LED lights with a long life expectancy.

    By switching to a solar system, there was no need to excavate the parking lots to install new electrical wiring and erect new poles. The new system required no below-ground work, which saved a tremendous amount of time and money.

    The solar lighting system removes parking lot lighting from the college’s utility grid, which is projected to save Delgado approximately $30,000 per year.

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    Benjamin Crump, attorney for Michael Brown's family, to speak at Dillard Tuesday night PDF Print E-mail
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    By Jed Lipinski, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune 
    Follow on Twitter 
    on December 01, 2014 at 10:30 AM, updated December 01, 2014 at 10:31 AM


    Benjamin Crump, the attorney representing the family of Michael Brown, the unarmed 18-year-old who was shot and killed by Officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, Mo., will deliver the annual Revius O. Ortique Lecture on Law and Society at Dillard University on Tuesday.

    The lecture, part of Dillard's Brain Food series, begins at 7 p.m. at the Georges Auditorium on campus. Prior to Crump's speech, Dillard President Walter Kimbrough will make an announcement about the opening of the university's Center for Law and Public Interest.

    Dillard has disclosed few details about the new center, but a news release issued Sunday described it as a place where the university's "work in law and social justice can reside."

    To read more about Benjamin Crump, visit Dillard's Brain Food Series page here

     
    Extra Credit PDF Print E-mail
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    Nola Defender

    noladefender.com


    The Lion and the Jewel

    Cook Theatre, Dillard University

    Dillard's Cook Theatre is one of the best-equipped big rooms in town. Following up its effective co-production of Freedom Summer, Dillard is now two-for-two this fall with its official season opener, Nigerian playwright Wole Soyinka’s evocative, lyrical The Lion and the Jewel. The work is a romping fable that deepens into unexpected complexity in its meditation on tradition versus modernism. The plot centers on the “Jewel” Sidi (Ariel Lucius), a vain and flighty young beauty of a Yoruba village ruled over by the ferocious chieftain “Lion” Baroka (Rahim Glaspy), who at age 62 seeks to make her the latest of his many wives. Baroka’s rival is the naïve but passionate schoolteacher Lakunle (Leon Delorch), representative of the forces of Westernized progress. The other principals are Baroka’s sly head wife Sadiku (LaSharron Purvis) and Ailatu (Destani Smith), his former favorite, who loses her place with Baroka because of her jealousy.

    In recasting a sweeping cultural clash as a mere romantic triangle Soyinka advantages himself of the same reductiveness that writers have relied on forever. Yet, with the The Lion and the Jewel Soyinka restores much breadth and depth to its subject through the expansive poetry of his writing. Soyinka’s characters simply can’t stop talking about who they are, what they believe, what they want… and it’s not exhausting, because his lyricism rivals Shakespeare’s. (No, I’m not kidding.) This is gorgeous stuff, and the Dillard students are just equal to it.

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    2014 New Orleans Film Festival: Pitch Perfect PDF Print E-mail
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    Dillardfilm Senior Edward Buckles faced the stiffest competition yet in the pressure-soaked documentary section of the PITCH PERFECT competition of the 2014 New Orleans Film Festival and won 2nd place! THIS MAKES DILLARD "4 for 4" (winning or placing) in 3 years of competition! Buckles documentary idea KATRINA BABIES, a "where are they now doc on his friends who have succeeded and failed because of Katrina" impressed the judges--from a head of Kickstarter(!) to Will French of Film Production Capital(!).
    "I have never been so proud," states Keith Alan Morris of Dillardfilm. "Edward really delivered and had the audience rooting for him--and the competition in documentary (portion) has never been tougher.  I liked that he gave Dillard Theatre credit in his acceptance speech as Dillard tries hard to be a holistic environment for creatives."
    Edward Buckles takes home $500 for his win.
    Title:
    2nd place winner, 2014: EDWARD BUCKLES (documentary division - titled "KATRINA BABIES")
    He joins PAST DILLARD WINNERS: 
    ERNEST ROBERTSON (1ST PLACE NARRATIVE 2011)
    CHRISTINE MAIDEN (TIE--2ND PLACE NARRATIVE 2011)
    EJAAZ MASON (2ND PLACE NARRATIVE 2012)
    2013 NO ENTRANT
    2014 EDWARD BUCKLES
    Photos on Twitter @dillardfilm  
    Higher rez available upon request.
    Kickstarter has already contacted us today about a partnership! This will benefit his film, the students, and the faculty's.
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    Norward Roussell, '60, Leader of Selma Schools in Turbulent Time, Dies at 80 PDF Print E-mail
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     New York Times


    Norward Roussell, who in 1987 arrived in Selma, Ala., as the city’s first black superintendent of schools with aspirations to equalize educational opportunity — only to be fired three years later amid racial animosities, protests and a school boycott that recalled the historic Selma-to-Montgomery civil rights march of 1965 — died on Monday in Selma. He was 80.

    The cause was myelodysplastic syndrome, a type of bone marrow cancer, his daughter, Melanie Newman, said.

    By the time Dr. Roussell came to Selma, blacks owned businesses and held administrative positions like postmaster, and many whites hoped that the bloody attack on demonstrators by club-wielding state troopers on the Edmund Pettus Bridge that had horrified the nation was distant, shameful history.

    “We were wrong,” Joe Smitherman, who was first elected mayor of Selma in 1964 as a supporter of George C. Wallace, Alabama’s segregationist governor, and served for 38 years, said in an interview with The Los Angeles Times in 1990. “And I don’t know how to say it better than that. And I was part of that wrong.”

    In Selma, Dr. Roussell (pronounced ROO-sell), who had been a top administrator in the New Orleans school system, chose to take on a very touchy educational issue: the “leveling” or “tracking” of students by ability. Poor minority students had tended to end up in the lowest of three groupings, and black parents had been protesting that their children were segregated into inferior instruction.

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